Tuesday , January 19 2021

Skin cancer kills men and excludes women … Why?




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In the last three decades, specifically between 1985 and 2015, the incidence of skin cancer in men in 33 countries was higher than that of women.

The study focused on an analysis of deaths from skin cancer in 33 developed countries in Europe, North America and Australia. The results were published at a medical conference organized by the British National Cancer Research Institute in Glasgow, Scotland on Sunday.

The study indicated that women's skin cancer rates decreased during this period or remained stable and did not change, but did not experience any increase, unlike men.

The study's researchers stated that they wanted to carry out an updated and expanded analysis of global mortality rates for skin cancer to try to understand these patterns of death and morbidity and there was some impact in the implementation of diagnostic strategies. Or a new treatment or prevention.

Men are more than women

For more than 30 years, mortality rates have increased for skin cancer and there are signs that men are less likely to protect themselves from the sun, CNN said.

Yang also said that men are less likely to participate in campaigns to raise awareness and prevent fatal illness.

But she said that it was still unknown if the biological differences between women and men had some effect.

The study showed that the biggest cause of skin cancer is excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation or the sun or the use of sun bathing.

The study found that Australia and Slovenia had the highest mortality rate for skin cancer between the sexes and that the death rate among skin cancer men in Australia was 5.72 cases per 100,000 citizens, compared to 2.53 died among women for every 100,000 cases.

Japan had the lowest rates of skin cancer in the last three decades, with Japanese men with 0.24 per 100,000 Japanese and 0.18 per 100,000 Japanese.

The country with the lowest incidence and death of men due to skin cancer was the Czech Republic, with an annual decline of 0.7 percent.

Australia recently developed a new technique to detect skin cancer by means of a blood test with precision of 84 percent.

Skin cancer is 1.7 percent of all cancer patients worldwide.

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In the last three decades, specifically between 1985 and 2015, the incidence of skin cancer in men in 33 countries was higher than that of women.

The study focused on an analysis of deaths from skin cancer in 33 developed countries in Europe, North America and Australia. The results were published at a medical conference organized by the British National Cancer Research Institute in Glasgow, Scotland on Sunday.

The study indicated that women's skin cancer rates decreased during this period or remained stable and did not change, but did not experience any increase, unlike men.

The study's researchers stated that they wanted to carry out an updated and expanded analysis of global mortality rates for skin cancer to try to understand these patterns of death and morbidity and there was some impact in the implementation of diagnostic strategies. Or a new treatment or prevention.

Men are more than women

For more than 30 years, mortality rates have increased for skin cancer and there are signs that men are less likely to protect themselves from the sun, CNN said.

Yang also said that men are less likely to participate in campaigns to raise awareness and prevent fatal illness.

But she said that it was still unknown if the biological differences between women and men had some effect.

The study showed that the biggest cause of skin cancer is excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation or the sun or the use of sun bathing.

The study found that Australia and Slovenia had the highest mortality rate for skin cancer between the sexes and that the death rate among skin cancer men in Australia was 5.72 cases per 100,000 citizens, compared to 2.53 died among women for every 100,000 cases.

Japan had the lowest rates of skin cancer in the last three decades, with Japanese men with 0.24 per 100,000 Japanese and 0.18 per 100,000 Japanese.

The country with the lowest incidence and death of men due to skin cancer was the Czech Republic, with an annual decline of 0.7 percent.

Australia recently developed a new technique to detect skin cancer by means of a blood test with precision of 84 percent.

Skin cancer is 1.7 percent of all cancer patients worldwide.


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