Thursday , October 28 2021

Second case of measles identified in the South Island



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Public health renews the MMR jab convocation as confirmed by the second case of measles.

SUPPLIED

Public health renews the MMR jab convocation as confirmed by the second case of measles.

Public health officials believe that the second case of measles confirmed at Marlborough this Thursday is related to the case reported last week in Milford Sound.

The 20-year-old woman has been isolated in Marlborough since Tuesday, November 20, and public health officials say it's unlikely that she would infect anyone.

Health doctor of the southern health board of the Dr. district. Susan Jack said the woman remained isolated during the infective period.

A thirty-year-old resident, Milford Sound, was confirmed to have had measles last week. Another close relationship of the couple, a man from Te Anau, was also suspected of having the disease and had been isolated since the first case of measles was diagnosed last Tuesday.

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It was not thought that none of the three patients had the measles vaccine.

The public health agencies of all the health forums of the South Island province have worked together to manage the outbreak.

Measles is a viral disease spread by contact with respiratory secretions due to cough and sneezing. People exposed to measles who were not immunized develop a respiratory disease with a dry cough, a nasal nose, a temperature higher than 38.5 C and probably feel very bad for the first time. An eruption begins on day four or five of the illness, usually on the face and moving through the chest and arms.

"Measles is a highly infectious disease. If you think you have symptoms of measles, it is vital that you do not visit your GP office, emergency room or a clinic hours later. Please call your GP or Healthline practice for advice "Jack said.

"People are infectious from five days before the onset of the rash at 5 days after the rash begins and must remain isolated during this time. This means that it is not in contact with people without immunization.

"If the vaccines are up to date, you will be protected. If you are not sure, you can check your vaccination status with your doctor or family doctor."

People were considered immune if they received two doses of MMR vaccine (measles, parotididae, rubella), previously had sarampel or were born before 1969. The MMR was available from its family practice and was free for eligible people, although it may There is an administration fee.

More information on measles is available at: https://www.health.govt.nz/your-health/conditions-and- treatments / diseases-and-illnesses / measles

More information about the holiday calendar in New Zealand: https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunization/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule

Anyone who has these symptoms or who believes they may have been exposed, can contact Healthline 0800 611 116 (free of charge and 24 hours) for additional advice.

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