Friday , June 18 2021

New iPhone backward, iPhone XR fights serious problems, Tim Cook hid iPhone details




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Going to see a new week of news from Cupertino, Apple Loop this week includes the disappointing sales of the iPhone XR, delayed for the iPhone 5G, the latest reviews of iPad Pro, why Tim Cook is focused on the iPhone, no more iPhone sales will be revealed, the PR angle to the recycled aluminum and repairing the new MacBook Air.

Apple Loop is here to remind you of some of the many conversations that have taken place in Apple for the past seven days (and you can read my weekly weekly news of Android here in Forbes).

The demand for iPhone XR is less than expected

How does the iPhone XR work in the market? When the pre-release order window was opened, it took a uncoordinated time before Apple lifted the "exhausted" posters. This lower demand seems to be a feature of the XR, with a 25 percent reduction in the demand that Foxconn is reported to reduce the number of assembly lines. Report by Lauly Li and Chen Ting-Fang:

Apple has indicated a disappointing demand for the new iPhone XR, telling its leading intelligent phone assemblers Foxconn and Pegatron to suspend plans for additional production lines dedicated to the relatively economical model that came to the shelves at the end of October, sources say.

"For Foxconn's side, he first prepared about 60 assembly lines for the Apple XR model, but recently used only 45 production lines as its main customer said that he does not need to manufacture many for now," a familiar source with the situation said.

More on the Nikkei Asian Review.

Starting the official sales of the smartphones of the iPhone XR in a re Moscow: Store shop, an authorized retailer of Apple. Sergei Savostyanov / TASS (Photo by Sergei Savostyanov TASS through Getty Images)Getty

iPhone 5G delayed

Although 2019 is ready to watch 5G mobile phones that dominate flagship, Apple's plans to bring super-fast connectivity to the iPhone have been affected. As reported, the Intel 5G chip is generating too much heat and can not be dissipated fast enough. This means more time of engineering, and There is no iPhone 5G until 2020 as soon as possible:

Where Apple goes? Tim Cook and his team worked to make Intel its sole provider in key areas and the expectation is that this relationship will continue. It would be a valuable move to switch to an alternative 5G chip provider (such as MediaTek), so the choice of Apple is to make a radical change with its supply chain, or keep the course and wait for the myth of Apple just introduce mature technology "will continue to be in force through the model next year and another twelve months later by the end of 2020 with the iPhone X4 (or will the iPhone XSSS?).

More here in Forbes.

Computer or tablet? Reviewing the iPad Pro

Apple's latest tablet is launched as a professional machine that will replace your computer. Can it really be a substitute for your laptop? That is the key to understanding the mission of iPad Pro, & nbsp;As I discovered earlier this week:

The idea is simple: the iPad Pro can replace your computer. The problem here is that this definition of a computer resides in Apple. If you have a requirement that is outside Apple's walled garden, it has a very expensive paperweight that has a few songs abba piano covers. And it does not take long in the failure of the iPad Pro. Take the USB-C port. It can work with monitors and keyboards, but asks you to connect to external storage, hard drives, cameras, flash cards and you will be waiting for a long time

More details about the reviews here in Forbes.

Apple CEO Tim Cook (C) talks while revealing new products during a launch event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by VCG / VCG through Getty Images)Getty

Why Tim Cook is ignoring his new Apple product

Apart from comments, Apple Tim Cook is concerned with the iPad, the Mac range or anything else outside the iPhone and Apple services? Yes, they bring a significant amount in dollars, but are the future of the company? Adrian Kingsley-Hughes argues that the latter are all who count:

Take a moment to absorb the fact that the Apple service business – consisting of digital content and services, AppleCare, Apple Pay, licenses and other services – is a bigger business than the Mac, and that "other products "- that includes AirPods, Apple TV, Apple Watch, Beats, HomePod, iPod touch and other brand and third party accessories, is larger than the iPad.

Now it can be argued that some of the revenue from services and "other products" comes as a result of the iPad and Mac, but taking into account the size of the iPhone's installation base compared to the iPad or Mac, it will only be a modest amount.

Apple's priority is to keep iPhone flow flush. Everything else is secondary.

More on ZDNet.

There are no more iPhone numbers

As discussed last week when he won calls, Apple will stop publishing iPhone sales numbers. Keeping in mind that iOS smartphones have been "basically flat from the iPhone 6", Apple's growth has been the rising cost of the phone. Hiding iPhone numbers means that this increase in growth is likely in a final, and Apple is trying to move the narrative to "services" rather than hardware sales or revenues. Ben Thompson explains:

Even so, although unit growth was stagnant for three full years (not just the past year, as many reports, including the previous, incorrectly declared), informing those numbers helped Apple tell its story: in the end, you needed numbers Unitary to calculate the average sale price.

However, reports are that sales of a unit are absolutely a story that Apple would prefer to avoid: it is very unlikely that the units will grow, and while Apple imposed even higher prices with the iPhone XS Max, it probably will not go much anymore There, which means that the average revenue growth history based on sales prices is also ending.

More on Stratchery.

People try new products during the launch event of new Apple products at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by VCG / VCG through Getty Images)Getty

The PR of recycled aluminum

In the launch of the new week of the new MacBook Air, Tim Cook and his team focused a lot on the use of recycled materials on new MacOS laptops. It looks good, but is there a significant benefit to the world, or is it a good bit of PR in a very standard practice for a modern technology maker? & Nbsp;Casey Williams takes the story:

The purchase of recycled aluminum is simple, inexpensive and probably a good commercial decision for Apple in any way, according to Kyle Wiens, who defends the recycling of responsible devices and serves as CEO of iFixit, a website dedicated to repairing gadgets.

"Aluminum is one of those things that are always recycled," says Wiens. "It's a cheaper way to recycle aluminum than my new bauxite mineral, which is why there is a strong demand for the scrap market. Really, this is the lowest hanging fruit in its commitment to 100 percent recycled material."

More in the Middle.

And at last …

The new MacBook Air is easier to repair. At least if it is Apple. The teardown team at iFixit discovered that the laptop has many new tabs to help eliminate the pieces, But getting to those parts will be very difficult unless you have Apple tools and guides.

But do not go thinking that Apple was soft on us. These design improvements have more to do with rework than repairable. The air still uses external pentalobes to keep it away, it requires a lot of removal of components for common corrections, and both RAM and storage are welded to the logic board. All together, this means that Apple has a simple time with your knowledge and tools, but the average DIYer does not run out when it comes to updates. We are not the ones we complain (ok, if we are), but we hope that this is just the beginning of an advance in the repairable design.

More on iFixit (e My thoughts on the implications here).

Apple Loop brings seven days of highlights every weekend here in Forbes. Do not forget to follow me so I do not lose any coverage in the future. Apple Loop last week can be read here, ou This week's edition of the sister column of Loop, Android Circuit, is also available on Forbes.

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Going to see a new week of news from Cupertino, Apple Loop this week includes the disappointing sales of the iPhone XR, delayed for the iPhone 5G, the latest reviews of iPad Pro, why Tim Cook is focused on the iPhone, no more iPhone sales will be revealed, the PR angle to the recycled aluminum and repairing the new MacBook Air.

Apple Loop is here to remind you of some of the many conversations that have taken place in Apple in the past seven days (and you can read my weekly news summary from Android here in Forbes).

The demand for iPhone XR is less than expected

How does the iPhone XR work in the market? When the pre-release order window was opened, it took a uncoordinated time before Apple lifted the "exhausted" posters. This lower demand seems to be a feature of the XR, with a 25 percent reduction in the demand that Foxconn is reported to reduce the number of assembly lines. Report by Lauly Li and Chen Ting-Fang:

Apple has indicated a disappointing demand for the new iPhone XR, telling its leading intelligent phone assemblers Foxconn and Pegatron to suspend plans for additional production lines dedicated to the relatively economical model that came to the shelves at the end of October, sources say.

"For the Foxconn side, it has prepared almost 60 assembly lines for the Apple XR model, but recently it uses only about 45 production lines since its main customer said that it does not need to make many for now," said a familiar source with the situation. .

More on the Nikkei Asian Review.

Starting the official sales of the smartphones of the iPhone XR in a re Moscow: Store shop, an authorized retailer of Apple. Sergei Savostyanov / TASS (Photo by Sergei Savostyanov TASS through Getty Images)Getty

iPhone 5G delayed

Although 2019 is ready to watch 5G mobile phones that dominate flagship, Apple's plans to bring super-fast connectivity to the iPhone have been affected. As reported, the Intel 5G chip is generating too much heat and can not be dissipated fast enough. This means more engineering time and not iPhone 5G until 2020 as soon as possible:

Where Apple goes? Tim Cook and his team worked to make Intel its sole provider in key areas and the expectation is that this relationship will continue. It would be a valuable move to switch to an alternative 5G chip provider (such as MediaTek), so the choice of Apple is to make a radical change with its supply chain, or keep the course and wait for the myth of Apple just introduce mature technology "will continue to be in force through the model next year and another twelve months later by the end of 2020 with the iPhone X4 (or will the iPhone XSSS?).

More here in Forbes.

Computer or tablet? Reviewing the iPad Pro

Apple's latest tablet is launched as a professional machine that will replace your computer. Can it really be a substitute for your laptop? That is the key to understanding the mission of the iPad Pro, as I discovered earlier this week:

The idea is simple: the iPad Pro can replace your computer. The problem here is that this definition of a computer resides in Apple. If you have a requirement that is outside Apple's walled garden, it has a very expensive paperweight that has a few songs abba piano covers. And it does not take long in the failure of the iPad Pro. Take the USB-C port. It can work with monitors and keyboards, but asks you to connect to external storage, hard drives, cameras, flash cards and you will be waiting for a long time

More details about the reviews here in Forbes.

Apple CEO Tim Cook (C) talks while revealing new products during a launch event at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by VCG / VCG through Getty Images)Getty

Why Tim Cook is ignoring his new Apple product

Apart from comments, Apple Tim Cook is concerned with the iPad, the Mac range or anything else outside the iPhone and Apple services? Yes, they bring a significant amount in dollars, but are the future of the company? Adrian Kingsley-Hughes argues that the latter are all who count:

Take a moment to absorb the fact that the Apple service business -which consists of digital content and services, AppleCare, Apple Pay, licenses and other services- is a bigger business than the Mac, and that "other products ", which covers AirPods, Apple TV, Apple Watch, Beats, HomePod, iPod touch and other brand and third party accessories, are larger than the iPad.

Now it can be argued that some of the revenues for services and "other products" come as a result of the iPad and Mac, but taking into account the size of the iPhone's installation base compared to the iPad or Mac, it will only be modest amount

Apple's priority is to keep iPhone flow flush. Everything else is secondary.

More on ZDNet.

There are no more iPhone numbers

As discussed last week when he won calls, Apple will stop publishing iPhone sales numbers. Keeping in mind that iOS smartphones have been "basically flat from the iPhone 6", Apple's growth has been the rising cost of the phone. Hiding iPhone numbers means that this increase in growth is likely in a final, and Apple is trying to move the narrative to "services" rather than hardware sales or revenues. Ben Thompson explains:

Even so, although unit growth was stagnant for three full years (not just the past year, as many reports, including the previous, incorrectly declared), informing those numbers helped Apple tell its story: in the end, you needed numbers Unitary to calculate the average sale price.

However, reports are that sales of a unit are absolutely a story that Apple would prefer to avoid: it is very unlikely that the units will grow, and while Apple imposed even higher prices with the iPhone XS Max, it probably will not go much anymore There, which means that the average revenue growth history based on sales prices is also ending.

More on Stratchery.

People try new products during the launch event of new Apple products at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by VCG / VCG through Getty Images)Getty

The PR of recycled aluminum

In the launch of the new week of the new MacBook Air, Tim Cook and his team focused a lot on the use of recycled materials on new MacOS laptops. It looks fine, but is there a significant benefit to the world, or is it a good deal of PR in a pretty standard practice for a modern technology maker? Casey Williams takes the story:

The purchase of recycled aluminum is simple, inexpensive and probably a good commercial decision for Apple in any way, according to Kyle Wiens, who defends the recycling of responsible devices and serves as CEO of iFixit, a website dedicated to repairing gadgets.

"Aluminum is one of those things that are always recycled," says Wiens. "It's a cheaper way to recycle aluminum than my new bauxite mineral, which is why there is a strong demand for the scrap market. Really, this is the lowest hanging fruit in its commitment to 100 percent recycled material."

More in the Middle.

And at last …

The new MacBook Air is easier to repair. At least if it is Apple. The teardown team at iFixit discovered that the laptop has many new tabs to help eliminate the pieces, but reaching those parts will be very difficult unless you have the Apple tools and guides.

But do not go thinking that Apple was soft on us. These design improvements have more to do with rework than repairable. The air still uses external pentalobes to keep it away, it requires a lot of removal of components for common corrections, and both RAM and storage are welded to the logic board. All together, this means that Apple has a simple time with your knowledge and tools, but the average DIYer does not run out when it comes to updates. We are not the ones we complain (ok, if we are), but we hope that this is just the beginning of an advance in the repairable design.

More on iFixit (and my thoughts on the implications here).

Apple Loop brings seven days of highlights every weekend here in Forbes. Do not forget to follow me so I do not lose any coverage in the future. Last week's Apple Loop can be read here or this week's edition of the sister column Loop, Android Circuit, is also available on Forbes.


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