Tuesday , June 22 2021

Women who smoke are more likely to have a heart attack than men



Women face a greater risk of heart attack than men smoke, according to a new study.

In fact, experts found that women who are heavy smokers were twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack like men who smoked a similar number of cigars.

And women with high blood pressure were almost twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack than men with the same condition.

The results suggest that the gap begins to close if women have unsafe lifestyles (Image: Getty)

The research, led by experts from the University of Oxford, also suggested that women with type 2 diabetes were at greater risk of heart attack than men.

However, men are more likely to suffer from a heart attack than women, while the average age of the first attacks among males is smaller than women.

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The results suggest that the gap begins to close if women have unhealthy lifestyles.

The researchers have warned that heart disease is still under the radar of most women and asked for equal access to treatments.

Published in the British Medical Journal, the study says: "Although the risk of (heart attack) is, on average, three times greater in men than women, women tend to" reach "to a certain extent if they have certain cardiovascular risk factors.

"Our results suggest that clinicians should be alert when their women are older, smoke, have diabetes or have high blood pressure.

Few more than 500,000 participants between 40 and 69 were hired for the study between 2006 and 2010 (Photo: Getty)

"These results also highlight the importance of equitable access to treatments based on guidelines for diabetes and hypertension and for weight loss and smoking cessation programs for women and men in middle and older age."

The researchers analyzed data from the UK Biobank, an extensive study of adults in Britain that aims to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of serious and dead illnesses.

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Few more than 500,000 participants between 40 and 69 were hired for the study between 2006 and 2010.

They investigated heart attack patients, who had no history of cardiovascular disease, for six risk factors; blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, body mass index (BMI), irregular heartbeat and socioeconomic status.

The data showed that women who smoked more than 20 cigarettes a day had twice the risk of heart attack than equivalent men.

Smoking between 10 and 19 cigarettes a day, having type 2 diabetes or hypertension of the first and second stage was 40% stronger associated with the risk of heart attack in women than men.

Meanwhile, high blood pressure was associated with a relative risk of more than 80% in women.

More: United Kingdom

The lead author of the study, Dr. Elizabeth Millett, told the BBC: "Heart disease also affects women and this should be recognized.

"Women should keep in mind that they are in danger, but despite many campaigns, it is still under the radar of most women.

"It's a complicated and long-term thing to work, probably caused by a combination of factors – both biological and social."


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