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US researchers attach Deutsche Bank, BofA, JPM to the Danske probe: Bloomberg



FILE FILE: Flags of bank Danske flutter in the Estonian branch of the bank in Tallinn, Estonia August 03, 2018. REUTERS / Ints Kalnins / File picture

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) – Criminal investigators in the United States have requested information from Deutsche Bank, Bank of America and JPMorgan on the transactions they have processed for the Estonian agency of Danske Bank, which is at the center of a money laundering scandal, Bloomberg reported cited friday sources

Danske Bank said last month that it faced a criminal investigation of up to 200,000 million euros (230,000 million dollars) of suspicious transactions in its Estonian sector between 2007 and 2015. The scandal shook the faith of investors in the largest lender in Denmark and forced the its chief executive and president to leave.

The Bloomberg report said there were no signs that Deutsche Bank (DBKGn.DE), Bank of America (BAC.N) and JPMorgan (JPM.N), which were corresponding banks of the Estonian branch of Danske, were their own research objectives.

He said that the examination that the three banks gave adequate scrutiny to Estonian transactions was part of Danske's wider investigation conducted by the United States Department of Justice and the prosecutors of the U.S. lawyer's office.

The Securities and Exchange Commission and the US Treasury Department also investigate the Bank of Danske's transactions through global banks, Bloomberg said.

Deutsche Bank, Bank of America and JPMorgan declined to comment when asked about the Bloomberg report by Reuters.

JPMorgan stopped liquidating dollar transactions outside the Estonian branch of Danske in 2013 due to concerns about money laundering, Bloomberg said. Deutsche and Bank of America stopped in 2015, he said.

Danske Bank, who refused to comment on the report, also faces criminal investigations in Denmark and Estonia.

Reports by Teis Jensen; Editing by Jacob Gronholt-Pedersen / Keith Weir

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